Academic News (News2Note) — May 2017

News2Note, the academic newsletter of the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, is published monthly during the academic year by Debra Stoudt, associate dean for academic policies and procedures. Academic news can be submitted to her directly at dstoudt@vt.edu.

Academic News

Outcomes and impact of a health study conducted in France by Barbara Allen, a professor in the Department of Science and Technology in Society, were highlighted in VT News.

With funding from the French Agency for Food, Environmental, and Occupational Health, Allen conducted a community-based environmental health study in Fos-sur-Mer and Port-Louis-du-Rhône, both located in one of France’s largest industrial regions.

The results of the survey and study indicate a much higher level of illness and chronic health problems compared to the rest of the French population; the results have been used to advocate for environmental improvements and to justify additional health research.

ASPECT doctoral student Judson Abraham published “Just Transitions for the Miners: Labor Environmentalism in the Ruhr and Appalachian Coalfields,” ​New Political Science 39.2 (April 2017): 218–40.

Danna Agmon, an assistant professor of history and a core faculty member in the Alliance for Social, Political, Ethical, and Cultural Thought (ASPECT), has been selected as the faculty principal for the Residential College at West Ambler Johnston. West Ambler Johnston is one of the 16 living-learning communities at Virginia Tech; it consists of four “houses” with 200 students each. Agmon will live in the community and facilitate lectures, social activities, and educational programs.

The following graduate students were inducted into the Academy for Graduate Teaching Assistant Excellence on March 28: ASPECT doctoral students Anthony Szczurek and Shelby Ward as associates, and Leanna Ireland, Sociology, Audra Jenson, Philosophy, and Christopher Savage, Curriculum and Instruction, as members. The purpose of the academy is to enhance the knowledge and skills in teaching through the provision of opportunities for graduate students to receive advanced education and training in innovative teaching and learning strategies and to recognize excellence in teaching by graduate students.

David Cline, a professor in the Department of History, was the keynote speaker for the conference “Organizing for Racial Justice, 1960s and Today,” held May 2–3 at Union Theological Seminary in New York City; the conference was organized around the publication of his book From Reconciliation to Revolution: The Student Interracial Ministry, Liberal Christianity, and the Civil Rights Movement, 1960 to 1970 (University of North Carolina Press, 2016). His presentation was titled “Racism and Student Activists in the 1960s: The History of the Student Interracial Ministry.”

The following doctoral students in Human Development received awards at the Center for Gerontology Recognition Ceremony, which was held on April 25. Aaron Ogletree received the Center for Gerontology Futures Board Scholarship and the Peggy Lavery Gerontology Research and Professional Development Award; Emma Potter received the Vetra R. Mancini and Jay A. Mancini Research Prize; and Yuxin Zhao, a master’s student in Sociology, received the AARP Memorial Fund Scholarship.

ASPECT doctoral student Julie Walters-Steele co-presented “Uncovering Stories from the Reynolds Homestead Enslaved Community” with John Whitfield and Kimble Reynolds, Jr., at the Virginia Association of Museums Conference, which was held March 18– 21 in Roanoke.

She presented the poster “The Buried Community of Rock Spring Plantation: Unearthing Stories of the Past” at the Annual Meeting of the National Council on Public History, which took place April 19 –22 in Indianapolis, Indiana.

In addition, she led the session “Success in Small Places: Leading a Creative Economy,” which dealt with her outreach work at Reynolds Homestead, at the Women in Entrepreneurship Conference, which was held April 27 in Newport News, Virginia.

Faculty members Richard Cole, a professor in the Department of Music in the School of Performing Arts, and Joseph Pitt, a professor in the Department of Philosophy, were recognized for 45 years of dedicated service to Virginia Tech and commitment to upholding the university’s mission. A complete list of employees recognized this year for 10 or more years of service (in five-year increments) can be found here.

The following College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences students accepted the invitation to become members of Phi Beta Kappa this semester: Caroline Amodeo, Music and Spanish; Karina Bakhshi-Azar, Political Science and Public Relations; Caroline Buscaglia, Political Science; Kelly Cooper, History; Kirsten Corbman, Literature and Language and Creative Writing; Jessica Craig, Professional and Technical Writing and Literature and Language; Samantha DiBiaso, Public Relations and Religion and Culture; Amelia Dirks, Creative Writing and Literature and Language; Kelsi Faley, Literature and Language and Creative Writing; Casey Foley, Political Science; Madeleine Gallo, Literature and Language and Creative Writing; Kayleigh Green, Professional and Technical Writing, Creative Writing, and Literature and Language; Kirsten Jersild, Literature and Language and Creative Writing; Benjamin Kodres-O’Brien, Philosophy; Katherine Leal, Political Science; James Lineberry, Political Science; Jessica Lull, Literature and Language; Timothy Maloney, Spanish and Finance; Robert Morrison, Political Science; Jenna Mortweet, International Studies; Skyler Mueller, Literature and Language; Rachel Palermo, International Studies and Spanish; William Patton, Political Science and Economics; Jared Rogers, History; Mollison Ryan, Creative Writing and Professional and Technical Writing; Jessica Savage, History; Andrew Snell, Political Science; Katelyn Toms, Classical Studies; Paul Wasel, Professional and Technical Writing and Literature and Language; Hannah Winston, Spanish and Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise; Bonnie Woodward, Criminology and Sociology; and John Wright, Philosophy. The initiation took place on May 11.

College faculty members David Cline, a professor in the Department of History, and David Hicks, a professor in the School of Education, published “‘If This Place Could Talk’: Using Augmented Reality to Make the Past Visible,” Social Education 81.2 (2017): 112–16, with Aaron Johnson, Todd Ogle, Douglas Bowman, and Eric Ragan.

The College notes with sadness the death of Peggy Meszaros, William E. Lavery Professor Emerita of Human Development and Provost Emerita, on April 18. Meszaros joined Virginia Tech in 1993 as Professor of Family and Child Development and Dean of the College of Human Resources. In 1995 she became Senior Vice President and Provost of the university, the first and only woman to date to hold the position of provost. During her tenure, a strategic plan for Virginia Tech was developed and interdisciplinary and international initiatives were pursued. From 2000 to 2015 Meszaros was the founding director of the Center for Information Technology Impacts on Children, Youth, and Families, which reflected her passion for outreach initiatives that was evident throughout her career. Meszaros earned her bachelor’s degree from Austin Peay State University, a master’s degree from the University of Kentucky, and a doctorate from the University of Maryland. A memorial service will be held May 13 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.  Additional information can be found in the VT News In memoriam as well as the funeral memorial page.

Alliance for Social, Political, Ethical, and Cultural Thought (ASPECT) doctoral student Emma Stamm presented “Vita Obscura: Obfuscating Biopower” at InfoSocial 2017, which was held April 7–8 at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.

Amy Azano, an assistant professor in the School of Education, published “Responding to the Challenges of Gifted Education in Rural Communities,” Global Education Review 4.1 (2017):62–77, with Carolyn Callahan, Annalissa Brodersen, and Melanie Caughey.

Five students from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences were among the 16 selected for the 2017–2018 Graduate School Diversity Scholars cohort. The students are: Melissa Faircloth, a doctoral student in Sociology; Jameson Jones, a doctoral student in Education Curriculum and Instruction; Elizabeth McKagen, a doctoral student in ASPECT; Thomas Murray, an MFA student in Directing and Public Dialogue; and Emma Stamm, a doctoral student in ASPECT. The students presented their Diversity Scholars projects on May 4 at the Graduate Life Center.

The College awarded Diversity Departmental Grants to the following projects during the 2016–2017 academic year: María del Carmen Caña Jiménez, an assistant professor of Spanish, and Vinodh Venkatesh, an associate professor of Spanish, in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures, for arts and foreign languages session for Explore VT; Tom Ewing, History and Associate Dean, for session on Virginians and VPI in World War I for Explore VT; Dennis Halpin, an assistant professor, and Paul Quigley, the James I. Robertson, Jr. Associate Professor of Civil War Studies in the Department of History, for Legacies of Reconstruction; Bertranna Muruthi, an assistant professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Science, for psychoeducational therapy for Latino families; and Daniel Wodak, an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy, for the Diversity Speaker Series in the Department of Philosophy.

 

College faculty who received Global Partnership Sustainability Awards during the 2016–2017 academic year were: Toni Calasanti, a professor in the Department of Sociology, for research on aging in the United States and Finland; and Aarnes Gudmestad, an associate professor in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures/Spanish, for “Crosslinguistic Influence and Grammatical Gender Marking in Second-Language Spanish.” Calasanti partnered with colleagues at the University of Tampere, and Gudmestad with a colleague at the University of Paul-Valéry in Montpellier, France.

The short film Poem to a Nameless Slave, directed and written by C. N. Bean, an instructor in the Department of English, and his grandson Xavier Bean, was an official selection of the 10th Annual Philadelphia Independent Film Festival, held April 26–30. It was recognized at the closing award ceremony as a Film Forum selection in the Documentary category.

Kelly Cooper, a History major, was named the 2017 College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Outstanding Senior. Cooper has served as editor of the Virginia Tech Undergraduate Historical Review for two years and engaged in her own research, an Honors thesis in which she compares the York Minster to St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City, focusing on preservation techniques for historic buildings. Her research, as well as her overall academic excellence, garnered her numerous awards and scholarships. Cooper is president of the Virginia Tech chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the national history honor society, as well as founder of Hokie Heroes, a program through which Virginia Tech students send gifts and cards to Corps of Cadets alumni serving overseas.

The Department of History held its Annual Undergraduate Research Showcase and Spring Tea on April 21. Among the History majors who were recognized were Kelly Cooper, who received the James W. and Martha N. Banks Award for a student with an exceptional academic record and particular interest in American history; Nala Chehade, who received the History Prize for her paper “Life Imitates Art: Analyzing the Social Impact of Graffiti Following the Arab Uprisings in Cairo,” written under the guidance of Carmen Gitre; Carolyn Carrithers, who also received the History Prize for her paper “An Oyster Spat: The Chesapeake Oyster Wars, 1860-1890,” written under the guidance of Mark Barrow; John Mark Mastakas, who received the Digital History Prize for The Kremlin Kronicle, a blog created for the upper-level Soviet history course taught by Amy Nelson; Robert Lee “Trey” Wells III, who received the Ut Prosim Spirit Award for his work in support of the department as a College Ambassador; and David Robison, who received the Hayward “Woody” Farrar, Jr., Award for outstanding achievement and scholastic perseverance.

Alliance for Social, Political, Ethical, and Cultural Thought (ASPECT) doctoral student Anthony Szczurek presented “Timing Climate Change: India and the UNFCCC” at the Ecologies of Injustice Panel organized by the Global Forum for Urban and Regional Resilience, which was held April 10 at Virginia Tech.

Lucinda Roy, Alumni Distinguished Professor in the Department of English, received the Zenobia Lawrence Hikes Faculty Women of Color in the Academy Award. This national award recognizes leadership and diversity advocacy. The award was presented at the annual conference for Faculty Women of Color in the Academy on April 2.

In addition, Roy published a collection of poems titled Fabric (Dee Why, Australia: Willow Publishing, 2017), and gave a multimedia reading from the book in the Cube of the Moss Arts Center on April 5. The reading featured artwork from the book, including the cover artwork painted by Roy herself.

 

The unveiling of the sixth volume of the Virginia Tech Undergraduate Historical Review took place at the Department of History Annual Undergraduate Research Showcase and Spring Tea on April 21. The following History majors at Virginia Tech published their work in this volume: Kelly Cooper, “Saving van Eyck and Leonardo da Vinci: The Power of Art during the World War II Era”; Parker Leep, “Roman Corbridge and the Corbridge Hoard: Reconstructing the World of Roman Britain”; Bekah Smith, “Freedom in the Night: Antebellum Life after Dark”; and Emily Stewart, “Take Cover: Nuclear Preparations in Montgomery County.”

The work of two non-Virginia Tech students was included as well: Christina Urquidi, University of Pennsylvania, “American Media Coverage of the Rise of Hitler: An Indication of Depression-Era American Isolationism or of a False Assessment of the Rise of the Chancellor?” and Ian Shank, Brown University, “From Home to Port: Italian Soldiers’ Perspectives on the Opening Stage of the Ethiopian Campaign.”

The following History majors served on the editorial board of VTUHR: Carson Bartlett, Caine Caverly, Kelly Cooper, Katie Cox, Samuel Lee, Scottie Lynch, Andrew Pregnall, and Renee Sheridan; Teresa Bliss served as Design Editor. History master’s students Kevin Caprice and Grace Hemmingson serve as managing editors, and faculty member Heather Gumbert serves as the faculty editor.

Jason Crafton, an assistant professor, gave the U.S. premiere of Starfish, a composition by Eric Lyon, an associate professor, for trumpet and computer, at Spectrum in New York City on April 22. Both are from the Department of Music in the School of Performing Arts.

James Hawdon, Director of the Center for Peace Studies and Violence Prevention, published “Addressing the Race Gap in Incarceration Rates: An Agent Based Model,” Corrections: Policy, Practice, and Research 2.2 (2017): 71–90, with Kristian Lum, Samarth Swarup, Jose Torres, and Stephen Eubank; the research was profiled in the VT News. In addition, Hawdon published “Virtually Standing Up or Standing By? Correlates of Enacting Social Control Online,” International Journal of Criminology and Sociology 6 (2017): 16–28, with Matthew Costello and Amanda Cross.

The following college faculty members were recipients of an Incentive Grant during the 2016–2017 academic year:  Danna Agmon, an assistant professor in the Department of History; Toni Calasanti, a professor in the Department of Sociology; Eunju Hwang, an assistant professor in the Department of Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management; Jeffrey Jackson, an assistant professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Science; Sarah Ovink, an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology; Ashley Shew, in the Department of Science and Technology in Society; Carolyn Shivers, an assistant professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Science; and John Wells, an associate profeesor in the School of Education.

Stefanie Hofer, an assistant professor in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures/German, published “Out of the Box: Television, Documentary Fiction, and the Art of Healing,” American Imago 74.1 (Spring 2017): 41–73, in the special issue titled “Psychoanalysis and Cultural Criticism.”

School of Performing Arts faculty members Dwight Bigler and David McKee, from the Department of Music, in collaboration with the Virginia Choral Directors Association and the Virginia Music Educators Association, hosted the 2017 High School All-Virginia Chorus and Middle School Honor Choir concerts in the Moss Arts Center. Three hundred middle school singers and 384 high school singers from across the state participated in the festival, which took place April 27–29. The Thursday evening concert also featured a performance by the Virginia Tech Choirs, under the direction of faculty members Dwight Bigler, Hyesoo Yoo, and Taylor Baldwin.

 

Erin Hopkins, an assistant professor in the Department of Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management, published “Incorporating Sustainable Features into Historic Renovation Projects: A Case Study of Roanoke’s Center in the Square,” Journal of Real Estate Practice and Education 19.2 (2017): 175–90.

Human Development and Center for Gerontology Core Faculty members Tina Savla and Karen Roberto, who also serves as Director of the Institute for Society, Culture, and Environment, were awarded a two-year NIH R21 grant titled “Families in Appalachia Caring for Elders with Alzheimer’s Disease (FACES-AD)” as Principal Investigators. The amount is $418,001, and the grant began April 1, 2017. Other team members include Human Development and Center for Gerontology Core Faculty members Rosemary Blieszner, Interim Dean, and Nancy Brossoie, along with Aubrey Knight and community partner Mountain Empire Older Citizen, Inc.

 

The following students were recognized at the Department of Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management Scholarship and Awards Program on April 20. Lauren Steele received the AHRM Outstanding Senior Award; she also was the recipient of the Fashion Merchandising and Design Outstanding Senior Award. The Family and Consumer Sciences Outstanding Senior Award was presented to Sarah Ummen. Tyler Bower received the Consumer Studies Outstanding Senior Award. The James F. Kelly Outstanding Senior in Property Management was Garrett Powell. Recipients of the Residential Environments and Design Outstanding Senior Award were Murielle Tiernan and Danielle Walther.

The following students were recognized as the 2017 Steger Poetry Prize Winners in this year’s competition, now in its 12th year; students in the college are in bold. Sophomore Microbiology major Leilani Padilla won first prize, $1,100, for her poem, “To My City of Lost Angels.” The second-place prize of $500 was awarded to Aidan Kincaid, a senior Creative Writing and Literature and Language major, for “Nunya Cera alba, an ode.” Junior Creative Writing and Literature and Language major Sarah McCliment was the recipient of the third-place prize, $300, for “Cold Stream Dam.” Earning honorable mention status were the following: Amelia Dirks, a senior Creative Writing and Literature and Language major; Hannah Esmacher, a senior Psychology major; Kelsi Faley, a senior Literature and Language and Creative Writing major; Kirsten Jersild, a senior Literature and Language and Creative Writing major who is dually enrolled as a master’s student in English education; Julia Lattimer, a senior Creative Writing major; Alison Miller, a junior majoring in Creative Writing, Professional and Technical Writing, and Literature and Language; and Haley Swoope, a first-year Multimedia Journalism major.

The competition is administered by the Department of English’s University Distinguished Professor of English Nikki Giovanni and co-directed by English faculty members Aileen Murphy and Joe Scallorns. At this year’s event, the ten student finalists read their entries, alternating with poems chosen and read by past and present faculty members of the Department of English.

The following students gave presentations at the Department of Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management Hands On, Minds On Celebration on April 25: Savanna Baxley, Residential Environments and Design, “Custom Kitchen Design for Client with Down Syndrome”; Angela Beckett and Rachel Kiser, Fashion Merchandising and Design, “Mad Men Fashion”; Brennan Convery, Consumer Studies, “The Effects of Age on Technology Related Privacy”; Angelina D’Souza, Fashion Merchandising and Design, “Virtual and Augmented Reality Leading the Fashion Tech Collusion”; Madison Kash, Property Management, “Housing for Later Life Conference and Investment Forum”; Visva Patel, Fashion Merchandising and Design, “Flat Patternmaking versus Draping”; and Abigail Rausch, Fashion Merchandising and Design, “‘What Lies Beneath’ Fashion Show.” In addition, the following students submitted abstracts that were on display: Kayla Branson, Fashion Merchandising and Design, “Ollie Dee: Shopping Local Matters”; Channing Cason and Sarah Minnix, Fashion Merchandising and Design, “Washed Ashore 2017: Fashion Show Planning and Preparation”; Jordan Cribb, Fashion Merchandising and Design, “Expanding a Portfolio: Designing for the Fashion Needs and Wants of Young Millennials”; Maica Gomez, Fashion Merchandising and Design, “M.A.G.”; Kara Heuple, Fashion Merchandising and Design, “Merchandising Strategies Product 1”; Caroline Johnson, Fashion Merchandising and Design, “Store Planograms”; Jasmine Johnson, Fashion Merchandising and Design, “Dangerous Beach: A Haute Line for the Unpractical Woman”; Tara King, Fashion Merchandising and Design, “Marketing to Generation X: The Forgotten Generation”; and Lauren Steele, Fashion Merchandising and Design, “Washed Ashore: Design and Development for Millennial Fashionistas.”

Students in HIST 2984 Introduction to Data in Social Context, taught by Thomas Ewing, History and Associate Dean, engaged in research on the history of tuberculosis in the United States that resulted in essays posted by the Medical Heritage Library, an international consortium of the leading medical historical libraries and archives, on its March 24 blog. The essays were: “‘Phthisiophobia’: The Tuberculosis Clinic in New York City and Popular Anxieties about Public Health Dangers” by Allyson Manhart, History and Political Science, Andrew Pregnall, History and Microbiology, and Harshitha Narayanan; “The Experiments of Dr. Robert Koch: A Reconsideration of the Scientific Method for Evaluating Treatments for Tuberculosis” by Christian Averill, Robbie D’Amato, Nathan Gibson, and Jonathan Silbaugh; “Tuberculosis in Boston: The Impact of Socioeconomic Factors” by Brian Yuhas, Claire Ko, History, and Emma Rhodes; “Tuberculosis in California: A Statistical Analysis from 1880–1910” by Jack Fleisher, Jae Ha, and Joey Hammel, History; and “The Impact of Tuberculosis on Adults as Measured by Philadelphia’s Vital Statistics” by Thomas Ewing and Nicholas Bolin, History and Computer Science.

The students also prepared a series of research tweets that were tweeted on World Tuberculosis Day, March 24, and then using Skype presented their research to researchers and program staff from the Respiratory Diseases Branch of the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases at the U.S. National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases. The presentations were: “Setting the Bar on Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Central/South Asia” by Yuhas, Fleisher, and Manhart; “Wealth and Disease: Tuberculosis in Southern Africa” by Averill, Rhodes, Ha, and Silbaugh; “Considerations of Treating HIV and Tuberculosis in Sub Saharan Africa” by Pregnall, Gibson, and Hammel; and “Gender Disparity of Tuberculosis Incidence in Southeast Asia” by Narayanan, Ko, and D’Amato; the tweets are available @DiSCVT.

In addition, the students researched data about the cities and counties in Virginia along the Appalachian Trail and produced a series of posters that were presented in the Multipurpose Room at Newman Library: “Divergent Data: Examining the Conflicting Impact Analyses for the Cities and Counties Along the Proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline” by Pregnall and Averill; “Quality of Life and Obesity: Health Analysis in Counties and Cities Along the Appalachian Trail in Southwest Virginia” by D’Amato, Gibson, Ha, and Yuhas; “Trails of Money: Tourism in Counties and Cities Along the Appalachian Trail in Southwest Virginia” by Ko, Manhart, Rhodes, and Narayanan; and “Schools Along the Trail: Education in Counties and Cities Along the Appalachian Trail in Southwest Virginia” by Fleisher and Hammel.

The following faculty and staff members in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences were winners of 2017 University Faculty/Staff Awards. Additional details regarding these award winners can be found here.

Mark Barrow, the chair of the Department of History, received the Diggs Teaching Scholars Award. He has enhanced the curriculum by developing and teaching eight new courses in his own department as well as other academic units and has collaborated with colleagues to create online modules for U.S. history classes. He has fostered undergraduate research through co-creating of a senior research seminar around the construction of a class book and through mentoring individual students as they pursue research projects.

Glenn Bugh, an associate professor of history, garnered the William E. Wine Award for his teaching excellence. He was recognized for his encouragement and mentoring of students on the Blacksburg campus as well as his role in the development of Virginia Tech’s Center for European Studies and Architecture, now the Steger Center for International Scholarship, in Riva San Vitale, Switzerland, where he taught on numerous occasions. His hands-on approach is also reflected in the part he played in creating the American Research Center in Sofia, Bulgaria.

Allison Craft, Administrative Assistant to the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs in the Office of the Dean, was the recipient of the President’s Award for Excellence. She was recognized for her efforts in creating a transition from the Curriculum for Liberal Education to the Pathways curriculum, which has necessitated the revision of almost 200 courses. She also manages the revision of departmental checksheets for major and minors, working with each academic unit to assure accuracy and completeness.

Edward Gitre, an assistant professor of History, received the XCaliber Award, which recognizes integration of technology in teaching and learning, for his development of HIST 3544 World War II: A Global History. He provides hands-on instruction in the use of digital history, which allows each student to contribute to The American Solider, a digital history project dealing with handwritten survey responses of World War II soldiers. Through the course students increase their understanding of the war, engage in humanity-based research, and contribute to meaningful public work.

Robert Jacks, the coordinator of Advising in the Department of English, was the recipient of the Provost’s Award for Excellence in Advising. Having joined the department in 2015 and been appointed to his current position in 2016, Jacks already implemented initiatives such as advising procedure videos for faculty, online office hours for students, and peer mentoring to connect transfer students with upperclassmen. He serves as the co-instructor of the First-Year Experience course and leads the summer orientation sessions for the department.

Kathleen Jones, History, was recognized with the Alumni Award for Excellence in Graduate Academic Advising. She has been an active member of the Department of History Graduate Committee and served on committees of numerous students completing the master’s degree with the thesis and non-thesis option. She was instrumental in implementing reforms to the graduate program and introducing workshops to prepare students for post-graduation opportunities such as pursuit of a doctoral degree or a career in teaching.

Christine Labuski, an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology/Women’s and Gender Studies, received the Diggs Teaching Scholars Award. She has developed two gender studies courses at the undergraduate level and one at the graduate level. Her experiences as a registered nurse and nurse practitioner served as the basis for a set of guidelines she created to assist teachers in promoting inclusivity in the classroom. Her interaction with students in the classroom is supplemented by her role as Associate Faculty Principal of West Ambler Johnston Residential College.

Nyusya Milman-Miller, Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures/Russian, was the recipient of the Alumni Award for Excellence in International Education. She worked to develop the Russian minor into a curriculum for majors and for many years organized and led a study abroad program in Moscow. The last four years she has directed Project Global Officer, a $1.5 million grant from the Department of Defense to support critical language training to Reserve Officer Training Corps students and to enhance language offerings in Arabic, Chinese, and Russian.

Janell Watson, Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures/French, garnered the Alumni Award for Excellence in Research. Her scholarly focus is contemporary French theory and often features the ideas of intellectuals from a variety of traditions, such as gender theorist Judith Butler, philosopher Felix Guattari, and psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan. Her transdisciplinary books and articles span the humanities and the social sciences. A member of the editorial board of Deleuze Studies, she currently serves as editor of the minnesota review.

ASPECT doctoral student Faith Skiles and Helen Schneider, an associate professor in the Department of History faculty member published a review of Daughter of Good Fortune: A Twentieth-Century Chinese Peasant Memoir by Huiqin Chen with Shehong Chen in Twentieth Century China 42.1 (January 2017): E–1–3.

Undergraduates Saalehah Habeebah, a junior International Studies major, and Rachel Hargrave, a sophomore Creative Writing and Literature and Language major, were among 14 undergraduates selected for the inaugural cohort of Fralin Undergraduate Research Fellows.

The program seeks to increase diversity in research and provides each student with $1,000 to conduct research. The Fellows presented their projects at a showcase on April 20.

Charles Nichols, an assistant professor in the School of Performing Arts/Music, presented Epimetheus Gift, for amplified bassoon, computer, and Ambisonics, with bassoonist Steve Vacchi, at the 2017 Society of Electroacoustic Music in the United States National Conference, held April 20–22 at St. Cloud State University in Minnesota, and at the Birmingham Electroacoustic Sound Theatre Festival, held April 27–29 in Birmingham, England, United Kingdom.

In addition, Eulogy (Risset), for computer music and processed video, a collaboration between Nichols and video artist Jay Bruns was presented May 5 at the Echofluxx Festival of New Media, Music, and Art, which was held at Paralelní Polis, in Prague, Czech Republic.

 

The following students in the college participated in the “Diplomacy Lab” course as part of the 2017 Washington Semester in Global Engagement: Political Science master’s student Catherine Kiess; and the following undergraduates: Brandon Boccher, International Studies; Flisha Choi, Political Science; Jessica Dorsch, National Security and Foreign Affairs; Taylor Holman, Political Science; James Kenney, Political Science; Karl Krull, International Studies; Maura McDonough, Political Science; Makeda Mesfin, International Studies; Ariel Rundbaken, National Security and Foreign Affairs; and Alyssa Taylor, Political Science.

The students presented “Preventing the Next Gaza Conflict” to a group of senior officials at the U.S. Department of State, including the senior political officer on Israel/Palestine and a representative from USAID responsible for Gaza.

The following faculty members were recognized as Institute for Society, Culture, and Environment Scholars: Principal Investigator James Hawdon, the director of the Center for Peace Studies and Violence Prevention, and Co-Principal Investigator John Ryan, the chair and a professor in the Department of Sociology, “Online Extremism in a Cross-National Context: Risk Exposure, and Participation,” $29,654; Co-Principal Investigator Cynthia Smith, an associate professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Science, with Richard Ashley, Principal Investigator Martha Ann Bell, Julie Dunsmore, and Angela Scarpa, for “Parent-child Behavioral and Physiological Synchrony: Foundation for Children’s Developing Self-Regulation,” $30,000; and Principal Investigator Abby Walker, an assistant professor in the Department of English, and Mike Bowers, “The Neuropsychology of Cross-Dialectal Communication,” $30,000.

The following students were awarded scholarships from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences in support of study abroad participation. For Summer 2017 Session I: Patricia Blackmon, Human Development, Spain; William Chenault, Spanish and Economics, Spain; Rachel Dougherty, Spanish and Psychology, Spain; Abigail Dunn, Multimedia Journalism, Switzerland; Alison Inderrieden, Human Development, Spain; Kate Karau, History and Political Science, France; Gabrielle Lozama, Public Relations, Spain; Eric Luu, Multimedia Journalism, Switzerland; Aubrey Medina, International Studies, Oman; Caroline Ritchey, National Security and Foreign Affairs and History, France; Megan Sharifi, International Studies and Spanish, Spain; and Emily Webb, Multimedia Journalism, Switzerland.

For Summer Session II: Garrett Whitlock, History, China. For Fall 2017: Jessica King, Communication Studies and International Studies, Germany; Tara Lackey, Human Development and Psychology, Switzerland; Ira Long, Political Science, Switzerland; Molly Maurin, Human Development and Psychology, Switzerland; Danielle Ratliff, Theatre Arts, Switzerland; Meagan Stacy, Political Science and Philosophy, Japan; Madison Sweezy, Literature and Language and Professional and Technical Writing, Switzerland; and Lauren Wong, Human Development, Switzerland.

Two College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences faculty members were honored with a 2017 Sturm Award. Stefanie Hofer, an assistant professor in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures/German, received this year’s Sturm Research Award for her creative research on post-traumatic recovery, namely a collection of three articles: “Lockout: Spacing Trauma and Recovery in the Aftermath of the Virginia Tech Shootings,” American Imago 72.3 (2015): 231-83; “Memoirs and Healing: Howard Reich’s The First and Final Nightmare of Sonia Reich Read through the Lens of a Trauma Victim,” Women in German Yearbook, 31 (2015): 99-121; and “Out of the Box: Television, Documentary Fiction, and the Art of Healing,” American Imago 74.1 (2017): 41-73.

Jason Crafton, an assitant professor in the School of Performing Arts/Music, was the recipient of the Sturm Creative Arts Award for his recording, Another Reason to Celebrate: The Music of Don Pullen, which celebrates the contributions to American jazz by an artist from Southwest Virginia; the recording also features the Virginia Tech Jazz Ensemble. The winners were recognized at the Phi Beta Kappa initiation ceremony on May 11.

ASPECT PhD student Mary Ryan presented “Child Rape and the Death Penalty” at the Virginia Humanities Conference, which took place April 7–8 at Shenandoah University in Winchester, Virginia.

Members of the Virginia Tech Wind Ensemble and the Virginia Tech Combined Choirs – the Chamber Singers, Tech Men, and Women’s Chorus – performed at Carnegie Hall in New York City on April 11. The concert featured 57 students in the Wind Ensemble and 108 in the Combined Choirs.

School of Performing Arts Music faculty members Jonathan Caldwell, the visiting assistant professor of music, and Dwight Bigler, associate professor of music, conducted the respective groups. Additional faculty participants were: Jason Crafton, trumpet, and Alan Weinstein, electric cello, both with the Wind Ensemble; Annie Stevens, percussion, with the Chamber Singers; and Ariana Wyatt, soprano, as soloist with the Wind Ensemble and the Combined Choirs.

The students also presented a concert at the George Mason Center for the Arts in Fairfax, Virginia, on April 10. Both performances featured a new work by Bigler, Three Appalachian Songs, based on folk songs historically associated with the Appalachian region. Students also performed a new arrangement of Bigler’s I Shall Not Live in Vain, composed for the 2014 installation of Tim Sands as president of Virginia Tech.

Faculty members Erika Meitner, an associate professor in the Department of English, and Charles Nichols, an assistant professor in the School of Performing Arts/Music, as composers and performers of the text and music respectively, presented “What Bends” with dancer and choreographer Rachel Rugh and video artist and programmer Zach Duer. The work – for electric violin and interactive computer music, accompanying narrated poetry, motion capture dance, animation, and processed video – was performed in the 134.1 speaker 3D spatial audio system, 360-degree surround video, and motion capture system of the Cube.

Ashley Reed, an assistant professor in the Department of English, published “Digital Humanities and the Study and Teaching of North American Religions,” Religion Compass 10.12 (2016): 307–16; and “‘I Have No Disbelief’: Spiritualism and Secular Agency in Elizabeth Stoddard’s The Morgesons,J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists 5.1 (Spring 2017): 151–77.

Erika Meitner, an associate professor in the Department of English, published the following poems in anthologies: “Meadowlands,” The Golden Shovel Anthology: New Poems Honoring Gwendolyn Brooks, ed. Peter Kahn, Ravi Shankar, and Patricia Smith (Fayetteville, Arkansas: University of Arkansas Press, 2017), 30–31; and “Swift Trucks” and “Continuation,” The Manifesto Project, ed. Rebecca Hazelton and Alan Michael Parker (Akron, Ohio: University of Akron Press, 2017), 201–06; and the essay “Some Notes Toward a Manifesto” in The Manifesto Project, 198–200. She also published poems in the following journals: “Threat Assessment,” Columbia Poetry Review 30 (2017): 251– 59; “Poem with Warehouse Fire & Disaster Recovery Team,” Ploughshares 43.1 (Spring 2017): 120–21; “Gun Show Loophole” and “Bread & Peace,” Cherry Tree 3 (February 2017): 87–94; “Are You Popular? (1947),” BOAAT (May/June 2017); “I’ll Remember You As You Were, Not As What You’ll Become,” Love’s Executive Order, posted April 14, 2017; “Elegy with Lo-Fi Selfie,” The American Literary Review, posted March 2017; and “HolyMoleyLand” and “Beyond Which,” Territory, posted February 2017.

In addition, “I’ll Remember You As You Were, Not As What You’ll Become” was installed at the end of April on the Grand Lobby stairs of the Moss Arts Center as part of its ongoing installation titled “22 Steps.”

Michael Hughes, a professor in the Department of Sociology, published “Racial Differences in College Students’ Assessments of Campus Race Relations,” Journal of College Student Development 58.2 (2017): 247–63, with Celia Lo, Debra McCallum, Gabrielle Smith, and Utz McKnight.

Three students in the College were among 11 named Citizen Scholars by the Virginia Tech Graduate School. Recognized for their efforts to combine scholarship with community engagement were: Katie Brooks, a doctoral student in Rhetoric and Writing; Thomas Murray, MFA student in Theatre Arts; and Bryanne Peterson, a doctoral student in Curriculum and Instruction. Detail about the students’ projects can be found here.

Timothy Luke, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Political Science, published “Seven Days in January: The Trump Administration’s New Environmental Nationalism,” Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 178 (Spring 2017): 197–201.

The following faculty members were recipients of a 2017 Institute for Society, Culture, and Environment Summer Scholar Award: Principal Investigator Eric Jardine, an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science, France Belanger, and David Raymond, for “Context Matters: How an End User’s Incentives Shapes their Online Behavior;” and Principal Investigator Carolyn Shivers and Jeffrey Jackson, both Department of Human Development faculty members, for “Adolescent Siblings of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Stress, the Sibling Relationship, and Overall Functioning.”

 

The unveiling of Volume IX of Philologia, the undergraduate research venue of the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, took place April 25 in the Multipurpose Room in Newman Library. The print version of the magazine includes creative scholarship as well as articles written by Philologia editorial staff that discuss research by undergraduates in the College; the research articles themselves are found in full in the online journal.

This year’s staff consisted of: editor-in-chief Emily Walters, Literature and Language and Professional and Technical Writing; managing editor Rachel Moore, Literature and Language and Creative Writing; associate managing editor Lindsey Flowers, Public Relations; associate editors: Carson Bartlett, Political Science, Multimedia Journalism, and Psychology; Rachel Beisser, Literature and Language; Taylor Bennett, Multimedia Journalism; Samantha Drew, Professional and Technical Writing, Literature and Language, and Political Science; Becky Felter, Public Relations; Kara Heuple, Fashion Design and Merchandising; layout editor Ryan Waltz, Multimedia Journalism and Spanish; and chief layout editor Elizabeth Howe, a master’s student in English.

Volume IX consists of the following articles and creative scholarship: “Hail to the Thief” by Paul Veracka, Literature and Language, article by Becky Felter; “Summer in San Francisco,” a poem by Alison Miller, Creative Writing, Professional and Technical Writing, and Literature and Language; “Stitches: The Relationship between Women and Short Legal Fabrication” by Alec Masella, Literature and Language, article by Rachel Beisser; “Arthurian Influence on Lord of the Rings” by Daniel Nozick, Professional and Technical Writing, article by Samantha Drew; “The God Committee: Likeness and Dichotomy” by Courtney Judd, Sociology and Psychology; “The Star of the Psalms: Geometric Structure of Psalm 136” by Rachel Sutphin, Religion and Culture, article by Rachel Moore; “Fueling the New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration and Racial Bias” and “An Independent Kurdistan: A Benefit to U.S. Foreign Policy” by Carson Bartlett, articles by Taylor Bennett and Grayson Lewis respectively; “Language, Violence, and Nonviolence” by Elizabeth Howe, article by Rachel Moore; “‘A Socialist Theory of Privacy in the Internet Age” by Scott Confer, Political Science and Economics, article by Kara Heuple; “An Exercise in Futility,” a poem by Michael Cisneros, Creative Writing; “The Digital Age,” a poem by Alison Miller; “Gender and Its Perception of Certainty with Clause-Initial Falsetto” by Emily Walters, article by Lindsey Flowers; and “Refusing to be Silenced and Demanding Respect: A Case Study about Black Female Sexuality in Popular Culture Focusing on Beyoncé Knowles” by Human Development major Lea Trageser, who graduated in 2016, article by Carson Bartlett.

Walters acknowledged the faculty leadership of Monica Kimbrell, Assistant Dean; Joseph Pitt, Philosophy; Robert Stephens, History; Debra Stoudt, Foreign Languages and Literatures/ German and Associate Dean; and Daniel Thorp, History and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs.

Also providing assistance throughout the year were the Faculty Review Board members: Patricia Fisher, Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management; Kee Jeong Kim, Human Development; Nancy Metz, English; Luke Plotica, Political Science; Emily Satterwhite, Religion and Culture; and Debra Stoudt.

Rachel Moore will assume the role of editor-in-chief for the 2017–2018 academic year.

Department of Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management faculty members Erin Hopkins, Dustin Read, and Rosemary Goss published “Promoting Sustainability in the United States Multifamily Property Management Industry,” Journal of Housing and the Built Environment 32.2 (2017): 361–76.

Carol Mullen, a professor in the School of Education, was awarded the 2017 NCPEA Living Legend Award from the National Council of Professors of Educational Administration. NCPEA is a premier professional organization in the educational leadership and administration discipline. She was asked to give the keynote speech at the Living Legend banquet, which will take place in August at the NCPEA conference in Puerto Rico. Mullen also was selected as the recipient of the 2017 American Educational Research Association (AERA) Learning and Teaching in Educational Leadership Special Interest Group Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award for Service. She is being recognized for her mentoring of students and junior faculty members in the field of educational leadership.

In addition, she and co-authors Mariela Rodriguez and Tawannah Allen were awarded the 2017 AERA Best Paper Award from the Action Research Special Interest Group for “Reculturing Learning Organizations from the Inside to Diversify and Change: An Action Research Study.”

Mullen received both awards and presented the paper at the AERA conference, which was held April 27 to May 1 in San Antonio, Texas. She also published “What’s Ethics Got to Do with It? Pedagogical Support for Ethical Student Learning in a Principal Preparation Program,” Journal of Research on Leadership Education 12.1 (2017): 1–34.

Sadie Gary, a senior in Sociology and Political Science, received the Phi Kappa Phi medallion for the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences. Gary excelled in a wide range of courses. She served as a Governor’s Fellow in 2015–2016, working at the Virginia State Capitol in the Office of the Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security. Gary has been involved with the Student Government Association at Virginia Tech and as director of Virginia 21, which focuses on young voters. Phi Kappa Phi recognizes and promotes academic excellence in all fields of higher education and engages the community of scholars in service to others. Each year Virginia Tech’s chapter of the society awards a medallion to one graduating senior from each college selected from among those students with the highest academic standing in the college

ASPECT doctoral student Katy Shepard participated in the art exhibition “Research in the Abstract,” which matched a local artist with a Virginia Tech Carilion medical student to produce works based on their research. The exhibit is on display April 10–July 31 at the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine in Roanoke, Virginia.

Shepard also participated in the “Laser” group show at Mish Mish in Blacksburg on April 28, and in the “Human Movement” group show at ICAT Creativity and Innovation Day 2017, which took place May 1 in the Moss Arts Center.

Alec Masella, a Literature and Language major, was among eight students representing Virginia Tech at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research. Masella presented “Attention Spans: A More Thorough Look” and “Stitches: The Relationship between Women and Fabrication in Short Legal Fiction.”

Masella’s faculty mentors were Nancy Metz, a professor in the Department of English, and Quinn Warnick. The conference took place April 6–8 at the University of Memphis.

The following college faculty members in the Department of History were recipients of a summer stipend research grant during the 2016–2017 academic year: Danna Agmon, an assistant professor, and Peter Wallenstein, a professor.

ASPECT doctoral student Caroline Alphin presented “The Necropolitics of Hacker Identity in Cyberpunk and Cybercities” at the Western Political Science Association Annual Meeting, which was held April 13–15 in Vancouver, British Columbia.

The following have been selected for the 2017 cohort of the Global Perspectives Program:

Katie Ayers, a doctoral student in Sociology; Chad Clem, a master’s student in English; Rachel Corell, a master’s student in English; Alex Jardon, a doctoral student in Counselor Education and Supervision; Karen Raymond, a doctoral student in Counselor Education and Supervision; and Anthony Szczurek, a doctoral student in ASPECT. Established in 2005, the Global Perspectives Program is an immersive experience that aims to better prepare graduate students to succeed as future faculty members and global citizens.

Alliance for Social, Political, Ethical, and Cultural Thought (ASPECT) doctoral student Mario Khreiche presented “The Hypernormalization of Anti-Semitism in American Mediascapes” at the 75th Annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference, which was held April 6–9 in Chicago, Illinois.

The following students in the college were among the 12 Stamps Scholarship recipients who attended the Stamps Scholars National Convention, which was held April 7–9 at Georgia Tech.

The students are: Galina Belolipetski, Music Composition and Computer Science; Jessica King, Communication and International Studies; Moira Miller, Spanish and Physics; and Rebecah Storms, Music and Mathematics. The Stamps Family Charitable Foundation partners with 42 schools across the United States to provide scholarships to students with strong leadership potential, academic merit, and exceptional character.

Roger Ekirch, a professor in the Department of History, published “A. Roger Ekirch on Americanism in the Early Republic” in the Wall Street Journal, April 8, 2017.

Eight students in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences were among the dozen 2017 Keystone Fellows, who embody the Aspirations for Student Learning. Honored were: Nala Chehade, a sophomore International Studies and History major; senior Public Relations and Religion and Culture major Samantha DiBiaso; Ashleigh Grubb, a junior Political Science and History major; Danielle Jeffers, a sophomore Multimedia Journalism major; senior Human Development major Jennifer Loh; junior Political Science and Russian major Mairead Novak; Alexa Parsley, a senior Political Science major; and Anna Pope, a senior History and International Studies major. More about the Keystone Fellows, including their digital stories, can be found on the 2017 Keystone Fellows website. The students were inducted at a celebration on May 1

Five graduate students from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences were among the nine new members recently named to the Virginia Tech chapter of the Edward Alexander Bouchet Graduate Honor Society. In addition to the three students previously identified, Adrien DeLoach, Higher Education; Jordan Laney, ASPECT; and Jennifer Turner, SociologyErin Lavender-Stott, Human Development, and Shekila Melchior, Counselor Education were inducted. The society seeks to develop a network of scholars who exemplify academic and personal excellence, foster environments of support, and serve as examples of scholarship, leadership, character, service, and advocacy for students who have been traditionally underrepresented in the academy – exemplifying the spirit and example of Dr. Bouchet, the first African-American to earn a doctoral degree in the United States.

Faculty members in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures/Spanish Vinodh Venkatesh, an associate proessor, and María del Carmen Caña Jiménez, an assistant professor, served as the guest editors of the special section of the Arizona Journal of Hispanic Cultural Studies 20 (2016) titled “Affect, Bodies, and Circulations in Contemporary Latin American Film.” Their own contribution was “Affect, Bodies, and Circulations in Contemporary Latin American Film,” 175–81, along with “Neoliberalismo somático: Sentimientos y afectos en Malos hábitos,” 183–202, by Caña Jiménez, and “Capitán Latinoamérica: Affect, Bodies, and Circulations in the Superhero Genre,” 269–83, by Venkatesh.

Debra Stoudt, a professor in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures/German and Associate Dean, published “Elemental Well-Being: Water and Its Attributes in Selected Writings of Hildegard of Bingen and Georgius Agricola,” Bodily and Spiritual Hygiene in Medieval and Early Modern Literature, ed. Albrecht Classen (Berlin and Boston: de Gruyter, 2017), 193–220.

The multichannel piece “Octopus” by Eric Lyon, an associate professor of music technology and composition in the School of Performing Arts/Music, received its world premiere at Spectrum in New York City on April 22.

Michael Saffle, a professor in the Department of Religion and Culture, co-edited China and the West: Music, Representation, and Reception (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2017), with Hon-Lun Yang.

His individual contributions to the volume were: “Preface,” with Yang; “Eastern Fantasies on Western Stages: Chinese-Themed Operettas and Musical Comedies in Turn-of-the-Last-Century London and New York”; and “A Postscript,” pp. ix–xiv, 87–118, and 283–88 respectively.

ASPECT doctoral student Johannes Grow presented “Through an Inverted Telescope: Provincializing the EU” at the Fifteenth Biennial International European Union Studies Association Conference, which was held May 4–6 in Miami, Florida.

ASPECT doctoral student Leigh McKagen presented “‘You Can’t Rape a Machine’: Examining Representations of Rape in Battlestar Galactica” at the Virginia Humanities Conference, which was held April 7–8 at Shenandoah University in Winchester, Virginia.