History Academic News

Daniel Thorp, an associate professor of History and associate dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs, published Facing Freedom: An African American Community in Virginia from Reconstruction to Jim Crow, American South Series (Charlottesville, Virginia: University of Virginia Press, 2017).

 

The Virginia Tech Board of Visitors recently conferred the emeritus title on the following faculty members in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences:

Frederic Baumgartner, a professor of  History, is a leading scholar of early modern France, military history, and the Reformation. His publications included nine books, one of which was recognized with the Charles Smith Book Prize from the Southern Historical Association, and he received numerous grants, fellowships, and awards for his research. In recognition of his teaching and research, the Virginia Social Sciences Association named Baumgartner Historian of the Year in 2002. A member of the Virginia Tech community since 1976, he served on many committees and commissions at the university and was active in numerous professional organizations as well. Baumgartner earned his undergraduate degree from Mount Saint Paul College in Waukesha, Wisconsin, and his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Eric McCollum, a professor of Human Development, was recognized for his impact on the field of Marriage and Family Therapy through scholarship, clinical work, and teaching related to substance abuse, domestic violence, and mindfulness meditation; he was awarded grants and contracts for the implementation and assessment of intervention programs in the first two areas. He joined the Virginia Tech community in Falls Church in 1992 and served as clinical director and program director of the Marriage and Family Therapy master’s program in the National Capital Region. He was recognized with the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Training Award for his clinical work. McCollum earned his baccalaureate and master’s degree from the University of Iowa and a Ph.D. from Kansas State University.

Marjorie Norton, a professor of Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management and a professor of Agricultural and Applied Economics, promoted the understanding of clothing and textiles through research on economic and trade policies, consumer economics, manufacturing, and merchandising as well as through service to professional organizations and journals in her field. She frequently provided expert testimony on apparel safety. Her teaching of undergraduate and graduate courses garnered her the William E. Wine Award for Teaching Excellence, and during her tenure at Virginia Tech, which began in 1980, she advised hundreds of undergraduates and dozens of graduate students. Norton earned her bachelor’s degree from Cornell University and a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota.

Marlene Preston, an associate professor of Communication, made significant contributions to the field of teaching communication and was recognized as an authority in instructional development and innovation in oral and written communication. A member of the Virginia Tech community since 1993, she served the Department of Communication in numerous administrative capacities, including Assistant Department Head. For her teaching, advising, and service she received awards at Virginia Tech, such as the XCaliber Award for Technology in 2015, as well as from professional organizations, including two Communication Centers Section Service Awards from the National Communication Association. Preston earned her bachelor’s as well as master’s degree from Bowling Green State University and a Ph.D. from Virginia Tech.

Barbara Ellen Smith, a professor of Women’s and Gender Studies, was honored for her contributions to Women’s and Gender Studies, sociology, geography, and Appalachian Studies; she was the author of four books and numerous articles and book chapters. She served as director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program and played an important role in the transition of the program to the Department of Sociology. She taught a variety of courses at the undergraduate and graduate level, garnering a Department of Sociology award for her undergraduate teaching as well as awards from ASPECT and Sociology for her work with graduate students. Smith earned her bachelor’s degree from Antioch College and a master’s degree as well as a Ph.D. from Brandeis University.

A project carried out during the fall semester by students in History of Modern Genocide, taught by Bradley Nichols, a visiting assistant professor in the Department of History, was highlighted in the Roanoke Times on December 24. Students transcribed some 7,000 German archival records related to the Holocaust for the World Memory Project, an initiative of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Ancestry.com.

 

The Virginia Tech Board of Visitors recently conferred the emeritus title on the following faculty members in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences:

Kathleen Jones, an associate professor in the Department of History, served as a leading expert on the history of the child guidance movement in the United States and of youth suicide, garnering support for her research in the form of a National Humanities Center Fellowship and a National Library of Medicine Publication Grant, among others. As a pioneer in the use of digital history in her teaching, she was the recipient of several grants as well. She joined the Virginia Tech community in 1991 and served as Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of History for 10 years; in 2017 she was honored with the Alumni Award for Excellence in Graduate Advising. Jones earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Delaware, a master’s degree from the University of Alberta, and a Ph.D. from Rutgers University.

Fred Piercy, a professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Science, made significant contributions to scholarship focused on marriage and family therapy as well as substance abuse intervention, serving as author or co-author of more than 200 publications. He was recognized with awards such as the Outstanding Contribution to Marriage and Family Therapy Award and the American Family Therapy Association Lifetime Achievement Award. He continues in his role as editor of the Journal of Marital and Family Therapy. In addition to teaching courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels during his tenure at Virginia Tech, he served as advisor to numerous doctoral students. Piercy earned his bachelor’s degree from Wake Forest University, a master’s degree from the University of South Carolina, and a Ph.D. from the University of Florida.

LaDale Winling, an assistant professor in the Department of History, published Building the Ivory Tower: Universities and Metropolitan Development in the Twentieth Century (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017).

Emily Harmon, a master’s student in the Department of History, published the editorial titled “The Woman’s Civic Betterment Club: How Women Shaped Roanoke,” which appeared in the Roanoke Times on November 23.

The following students in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences were awarded scholarships for the 2017–2018 academic year.

The Dean’s Rising Senior Scholarship was awarded to Makeda Mesfin, International Studies. Recipients of the Dean’s Rising Junior Scholarship and Rising Sophomore Scholarship were Kevin Foster, Theatre and Cinema, and Jenna Humphrey, International Studies, respectively.

The following students were recipients of a Destiny Scholarship: Olamiposi Akinyemi, Political Science; Taylor Anderson, Political Science; Tyra Anderson, Human Development; Hannah Ange, Literature and Language; Madison Arnesen, Political Science; Curtis Batchelor, National Security and Foreign Affairs; Megan Church, Communication Studies; Danielle Cieslewicz, Fashion Merchandising and Design; Shannon Clarke, Theatre Arts; Sarah Coates, International Studies; Meaghan Doherty, Political Science; Mariah Evans, Criminology; Madeleine Gagne, International Relations; Lidia Guerra, Political Science; Noah Hairston, Multimedia Journalism; Diana Harley, Political Science; Connor Ingalsbe, International Studies; Danielle Jeffers, Multimedia Journalism; Halle Jordan, Multimedia Journalism; Haein Kim, International Studies; Alexander Knight, International Studies; Desiree Laureano, International Relations; A’via Linton, Spanish; Gabrielle Lozama, Multimedia Journalism; Matthew McPherson-Jaramillo, Multimedia Journalism; Casey Molina, Multimedia Journalism; Joshua Morrison, Music; Corrine Murray, Public Relations; Elisa Nicolini, International Relations; Casey Pongonis, Professional and Technical Writing; Collin Sabine, Political Science; Hunter Shinn, Classical Studies; Sierra Spain, Communication Studies; Virginia Stephenson, Multimedia Journalism; Rachel Sutphin, Religion and Culture; Luca Thoms, Political Science; Zachary Weeks, Classical Studies; Cassidy Whitlow, Human Development; Jada Woodson, Fashion Merchandising and Design; Ryea Young, Human Development; Jason Yoxthimer, Communication Studies; and Amy Zelaya, Human Development.

Recipients of the Austin Student Veterans Scholarship were Mallary Brown, School of Education, and William Thomas IV, Political Science.

Awarded the Tom Barton Family Scholarship was Sara McNulty, Political Science.

Jessica King, Communication Studies and International Studies, received the Dean Robert Bates Scholarship as well as the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Senior Challenge Book Scholarship.

The Megan E. Christenson Memorial Scholarship was awarded to Courtney Flickinger, Multimedia Journalism.

Human Development doctoral student Shelby Borowski was recognized with the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Faculty Campaign Scholarship and the Mildred Tate Scholarship.

Sarah Lim, Literature and Language, was recognized with the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Staff Association Scholarship and the Susan Pascoe Farrell Scholarship.

The following students were recipients of a Martha Price Hancock Scholarship: Theodore Alt, Music Education and Music Performance; Vincent DiNardo, Music; Rachel Hargrave, Creative Writing; and Lauren Weaver, Spanish.

Receiving a Laura Jane Harper Scholarship were: Danielle Cieslewicz, Fashion Merchandising and Design; Emilee Cruz, Fashion Merchandising and Design; Benjamin Graulich, Residential Environments and Design; Makahla Stout, Fashion Merchandising and Design; and Junhua Zhang, Consumer Studies.

Stefnie Cerny, Theatre Arts Design and Studio Art, and Sarah Lim, Literature and Language, were recognized with a Hallie L. Hughes Memorial Scholarship.

Kathryn Kowalski, Professional and Technical Writing and Literature and Language, was awarded the Hulick Scholarship for Leadership, Friendship, and Service.

The John and Jane Milne Academic Scholarship was awarded to Juri Oh, Human Development.

The following students received the Moody, Pratt, Minor Scholarship: Matthew Barrett, Russian; Stefnie Cerny, Theatre Arts Design and Studio Art; Emily Hoyt, Human Development; Haley Meade, Religion and Culture and Biochemistry; Makeda Mesfin, International Studies; Caroline Nicotra, Spanish and Biological Sciences; Kaelyn Petrides, Public Relations; and Nikki Tobler, Theatre Performance.

Lyn O’Connell, Human Development, was the recipient of the James D. Moran Memorial Scholarship.

A Nelson–Lehmann–Gold–VanSant Family Scholarship was awarded to Jesse Marie Acierto, Human Development, and Melody Gregory, Human Development.

Recognized with the John Rathbone Scholarship were: Sarah Lim, Literature and Language; Scottie Lynch, History and Business Leadership; and John Mastakas, History.

Mary Karen Read Memorial Scholarships were awarded to Amy Crow, Jordan Fuller, and Vanessa Robinson, all Human Development.

Receiving a Robichaud Family Scholarship were: Jesse Marie Acierto, Human Development; Theodore Alt, Music Education and Music Performance; Paige Bailey, Fashion Merchandising and Design; Raleigh Christian, Political Science; Lauren Farrar, Music and Multimedia Journalism; Jesse Hughes, Music Education; and Kathryn Kowalski, Professional and Technical Writing and Literature and Language.

Sarah Patton, International Studies, was the recipient of the Ora Goodwin Roop Scholarship.

The following were awarded a Margaret Groseclose Skelton Scholarship: Molly Maurin, Human Development and Psychology; Jordan Mercer, Consumer Studies; and Leah Richards, Literature and Language.

The recipient of the Maryellen Spencer Scholarship was Lauren Weaver, Spanish.

Holly Hunter, Public Relations, and Kayla Parrish, Human Development, received a Margaret Rawlinson Svoboda 4–H Scholarship.

Mildred Crawford Weidemann Scholarships were awarded to: John Mastakas, History; Molly Maurin, Human Development and Psychology; Paige Moorman, Fashion Merchandising and Design and Spanish; and Natalie Tabor, Human Development.

Haley Meade, Religion and Culture and Biochemistry, was the recipient of the Mildred E. Young Scholarship.

Students awarded College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Education Abroad Scholarships were also acknowledged; their names appeared in the May 2017 issue of News2Note.

All of the recipients above as well as the donors who support the scholarships were recognized at a dinner on October 19.

 

A. Roger Ekirch, a professor in the Department of History, wrote an op-ed titled “Asylum Once Defined America. Now, It Stands Imperiled,” which was published in The Guardian on September 3. Ekirch’s research on sleep was highlighted as #6 of “10 Things to Know about Sleep,” posted by the BBC News on October 28.

E. Thomas Ewing, a professor of History and associate dean for Graduate Studies and Research, was awarded the Ferenc Gyorgyey Research Travel Grant of $1,500 from the Yale University Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library to support research on the project, ‘The Grip[pe], and the Nerve Exhaustion that Followed It’: Research on the History of Tuberculosis and Influenza in Yale Medical Historical Collections.” The research at the Yale Medical Historical Library is part of continuing projects involving undergraduate student researchers on the history of medicine in American and world history.

In addition, Ewing published “Will It Come Here? Using Digital Humanities Tools to Explore Medical Understanding during the Russian Flu Epidemic, 1889–90,” Medical History 61.3 (2017): 474–77.

A Digital Humanities Advancement grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities Office of Digital Humanities was awarded to a team of Virginia Tech faculty: E. Thomas Ewing, a professor in the Department of History and associate dean for Graduate Studies and Research, project director; Amy Nelson, an associate professor in the Department of History, consulting scholar; Samarth Swarup, Biocomplexity Institute, Consulting Scholar; and Peter Potter, University Libraries, Editorial Board Member. The grant of $40,000 supports the Viral Networks workshop, which will take place in January 2018 at the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine on the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Maryland. The workshop is designed for scholars and graduate students working at the intersection of medical history and digital humanities interested in using the tools of network analysis to advance scholarship.

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