Media Mentions

Department:
Political Science
Published Date:
03/01/2019
Media Source:
WVTF
Faculty Name:
Caitlin Jewitt
Summary:

Excerpt: “We think of our political parties as the backbone of American electoral politics, but as Caitlin Jewitt reminds us, “You have to remember, that the constitution doesn’t even mention political parties and it doesn’t mention anything about how we nominate candidates for office. ’That’s right, the parties make their own rules and as the saying goes,’ those who make the rules win the game.’ Jewitt teaches political science at Virginia Tech and she’s just written a new book is called, ‘The Primary Rules.’”

Department:
Religion and Culture
Published Date:
01/16/2019
Media Source:
WVTF
Faculty Name:
Matthew Gabriele
Summary:

Excerpt: “President Donald Trump’s demand to build a wall on the southern border has not only led to a government stalemate, it’s also misrepresenting history. Matthew Gabriele teaches medieval studies at Virginia Tech, so he knows a lot about the walls that were built around cities and castles in the middle ages.”

Department:
Religion and Culture
Published Date:
01/06/2019
Media Source:
Forbes
Faculty Name:
Matthew Gabriele
Department:
Religion and Culture
Published Date:
01/02/2019
Media Source:
Perspectives on History (American Historical Association Newsmagazine)
Faculty Name:
Matthew Gabriele
Department:
Communication
Published Date:
01/02/2019
Media Source:
WJLA DC
Faculty Name:
Michael Horning
Summary:

I was interviewed about Facebook’s hate speech policy and whether it was unfair to certain groups on Facebook.

Department:
Political Science
Published Date:
12/15/2018
Media Source:
Boston Herald
Faculty Name:
Aaron Brantly
Department:
Human Development and Family Science
Published Date:
12/07/2018
Media Source:
The New York Times
Faculty Name:
Pamela Teaster
Department:
English
Published Date:
12/06/2018
Media Source:
NPR
Faculty Name:
Erika Meitner
Summary:

Excerpt: “Erika Meitner … is a professor at Virginia Tech. … This is a book that really is dealing with raising kids in difficult environments and also kind of facing down the epidemic of gun violence in this country — which makes it sound like it might be kind of a depressing book. But what really impressed me about it is how beautiful and tender it is. It’s really just a live wire. She’s a Jew in Appalachia raising an African-American adopted son. She is and isn’t at home. She’s kind of meditating on these things but she does so in this very incantatory, almost prayer-like way.”

Department:
History
Published Date:
12/05/2018
Media Source:
Star Tribune
Faculty Name:
John Legg, Graduate Student in History
Department:
Political Science
Published Date:
11/30/2018
Media Source:
CNN
Faculty Name:
Aaron Brantly
Department:
School of Education
Published Date:
11/13/2018
Media Source:
Education Week
Faculty Name:
Amy Price Azano
Summary:

Excerpt: “The PLACE districts use a common gifted education framework developed by the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented at the University of Connecticut. Co-investigators of the project, Carolyn Callahan, an education professor at the University of Virginia, and Amy Price Azano, an assistant education professor at Virginia Tech, surveyed educators in all of the participating districts in Kentucky and Virginia about local folklore, history, and landmarks, as well as the businesses and resources available and how connected the community is to other areas. The results were used to tweak curriculum plans for local contexts…”

Department:
History
Published Date:
11/12/2018
Media Source:
WFXR
Faculty Name:
Edward Gitre
Department:
English
Published Date:
11/10/2018
Media Source:
Carve Magazine
Faculty Name:
Matthew Vollmer
Department:
History
Published Date:
11/06/2018
Media Source:
WVTF
Faculty Name:
LaDale Winling
Summary:
    Excerpt: “Virginia Tech History Professor LaDale Winling, and a team from the Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond created an interactive map of U.S. congressional districts. It illustrates how the political landscape has changed over time.

    “‘We can know not only how congressional boundaries have changed,’ said Winling, ‘but we can do all kinds of evaluations — population density, strength of victory — and we can evaluate the process in an overarching comprehensive way.’”

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