Philosophy Academic News

The college is pleased to announce the following tenure and promotion decisions by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors at its June 6 meeting.

Promoted to associate professor with tenure were: Danna Agmon, History and ASPECT Core Faculty; Amy Azano, School of Education; María del Carmen Caña Jiménez, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures; Jason Crafton, School of Performing Arts; Erika Grafsky, Human Development and Family Science; Stefanie Hofer, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures; Eunju Hwang, Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management; Benjamin Jantzen, Philosophy; Melanie Kiechle, History; Christine Labuski, Sociology; Philip Olsen, Science, Technology, and Society; Dustin Read, Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management; Nadine Sinno, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures; Trevor Stewart, School of Education; Catherine Ulrich, School of Education; LaDale Winling, History; and Haiyan Zhu, Sociology.

Promoted to the rank of professor in the past academic year were: Janet Abbate, Science, Technology, and Society; April Few-Demo, Human Development and Family Science; Matthew Gabriele, Religion and Culture; James Ivory, Communication; Gerard Lawson, School of Education; Heidi Anne Mesmer, School of Education; Lydia Patton, Philosophy; Tina Savla, Human Development and Family Science; and John Wells, School of Education.

Also recognized with promotion were the following: Joseph Scallorns, English, to senior instructor; Matthew Goodrum, Science, Technology, and Society, to collegiate associate professor; and Peggy Quesenberry, Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management, to collegiate assistant professor.

The following graduate students were inducted into the Academy for Graduate Teaching Assistant Excellence on March 28: ASPECT doctoral students Anthony Szczurek and Shelby Ward as associates, and Leanna Ireland, Sociology, Audra Jenson, Philosophy, and Christopher Savage, Curriculum and Instruction, as members. The purpose of the Academy is to enhance the knowledge and skills in teaching through the provision of opportunities for graduate students to receive advanced education and training in innovative teaching and learning strategies and to recognize excellence in teaching by graduate students.

The unveiling of Volume X of Philologia, the undergraduate research venue of the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, took place April 30 in the Multipurpose Room in Newman Library. The print version of the magazine includes creative scholarship as well as articles written by Philologia editorial staff that discuss research by undergraduates in the College; the research articles themselves are found in full in the online journal.

This year’s staff consisted of: editor-in-chief Rachel Moore, Literature and Language and Creative Writing; managing editor Emily Purcell, Creative Writing and Fashion Merchandising and Design; associate editors: Rachel Beisser, Professional and Technical Writing and Literature and Language; Lindsay Boerger, HistorySophia Campos, Philosophy, Political Science, and Economics and Political ScienceMichelle Corinaldi, SociologyBecky Felter, Public Relations and Professional and Technical Writing; Holly Hunter, Public Relations; and Nicole Kurka, Literature and Language Pre-Education and Professional and Technical Writing; chief layout editor Ryan Waltz, Multimedia Journalism and Spanish; and layout editor Taylor Bush, Multimedia Journalism and Fashion Merchandising and Design.

Volume X consists of the following articles and creative scholarship:“A Case Study in Religion and Culture: Faith Healing in the United States within the Christian Traditions” by Rachel Sutphin, Human Development, International Studies, and Religion and Culture, article by Becky Felter; “Human Trafficking of Children on a Global Scale” by Lauren Percherke, Management, article by Michelle Corinaldi; “A World ‘Made of Breath’: Cormac McCarthy and the Oral Storytelling Tradition” by Joshua Kim, Literature and Language, article by Rachel Beisser; “Evaluating Differences in Serial Murderers on a Global Scale” by Grace Kim, Criminology, Political Science, and Sociology, article by Kim Boerger; “Tarot in Blood Meridian” by Demetria Lee, a Political Science, Philosophy, and Literature and Language alumna, article by Sophia Campos; “Writhe: After Slave Shipby J.M.W. Turner,” a poem by Shalini Rana, Creative Writing and Professional and Technical Writing; “Exploring Turn-taking and Discourse Markers through Generations” by Literature and Language alumna Meghan Kolcum, article by Nicole Kurka; and “Impact of Christianity on Israel-Palestine Peace Relations” by Rachel Sutphin, article by Holly Hunter.

The assistance of College administrators – Monica Kimbrell, assistant dean; Daniel Thorp, History and associate dean; and Debra Stoudt, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures and associate dean – was acknowledged as was the support and guidance from college faculty and review board members: Patricia Fisher, Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management; Nancy Metz, EnglishShaily Patel, Religion and Culture; Luke Plotica, Political Science; and Robert Stephens, History.

Emily Purcell will assume the role of editor-in-chief for the 2018–2019 academic year.

The following College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences students accepted the invitation to become members of Phi Beta Kappa this semester: Emily Allen, Political Science; Alexa Amster, French and Public Relations; Mycah Ausberry, French and Public Relations;Julia Billingsley, Political Science; Alexandra Bochna, History and Political Science; Nala Chehade, History and International Studies; Samantha Conlin, Human Development; Amy Davis, Spanish; Ashley Doyle, Public Relations; Samantha Drury, Political Science; Deonté Easter, International Studies; Ann Esmond, Creative Writing and Literature and Language; Megan Finkbeiner, Public Relations; Dara Finley, Political Science; Caroline Fountain, Political Science; Zane Grey, Political Science; Cassandra Hanson, Music; Maria Jernigan, Philosophy, Spanish, and Theatre Arts; Kyle Jewell, Philosophy; Alexa Jones, Political Science; Alexandra Jones, Russian; Andrew Kapinos, History; Joshua Kim, Literature and Language; Jessica King, Communication Studies and International Studies; Ashton Lineberry, Literature and Language; Kyle Manuel, Political Science; John Mastakas, History; Haley Meade, Religion and CultureAllyson Miller, International Studies; Kenneth Miller, Classical Studies and History; Nicholas Milroy, Political Science; Jillian Mouton, Creative Writing, Literature and Language, and Professional and Technical Writing; Kelly O’Brien, Criminology and Sociology; Virginia Pellington, Multimedia Journalism; Anna Pendleton, Public Relations and Spanish; Michaela Podolny, International Studies and Religion and Culture; Shalini Rana, Creative Writing and Professional and Technical Writing; Diana Schulberg, Political Science; Sarah Shinton, Political Science; Rachel Sutphin, Human Development, International Studies, and Religion and Culture; Carter Thompson, International Studies; Tully Thompson, Classical Studies; Jacob Tyler, Criminology; Katherine Wagner, Creative Writing; Stephen White, Philosophy; Madeline Williams, Spanish; and Nicholas Work, Political Science. The initiation took place on May 10.

The College awarded Departmental Diversity Grants to the following projects during the 2017–2018 academic year: Aaron Ansell, an associate professor in the Department of Religion and Culture, partnership with the Department of History, the School of Visual Arts, and historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) for research and graduate student recruitment; Gena Chandler-Smith, an associate professor, and Virginia Fowler, a professor in the Department of English, partnership with Virginia HBCUs to build a mentoring network to support research and graduate student recruitment; Sukaina Hirji and Daniel Wodak, an assistant professors in the  Department of Philosophy, speaker series to advance diversity in the field of philosophy; Eunju Hwang, an assistant professor in the Department of Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management, partnership with HBCUs for a research symposium, class projects, and other collaborations; and Annie Stevens, an assistant professor in the School of Performing Arts, funding for a visiting percussionist from Ghana.

Maria Jernigan, a philosophy, Spanish, and theatre arts major, was named the 2018 Undergraduate Student of the Year; she is also the winner of the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Outstanding Senior Award.

Travel and exploring new ways of thinking have been hallmarks of Jernigan’s four years at Virginia Tech. Observing teaching practice in Finland led her to discover project-based learning, which involves students solving real-world problems collaboratively; she subsequently interviewed educators in Australia, New Zealand, and Singapore as well as in different regions of the United States about this type of learning.

Through a Fulbright Summer Institute at the Globe Theatre in London, she became acquainted with Shakespearean theatre practices, and she took part in discussions regarding human rights violations on two occasions at the Oslo Freedom Forum in Norway.

Participation in a Presidential Global Scholars project involving asylum seekers allowed Jernigan to put her Spanish language skills to use as an interpreter during interviews. As a Fellow for Summit.Ahead., a California-based non-profit, she traveled to Iceland to engage in projects about the future of learning and the workforce. She has created her own educational startup (see below), which is focused on motivating students to learn in new ways.

The Undergraduate Student of the Year award is the most prestigious non-academic undergraduate award at Virginia Tech; among the criteria are achievements in academics, leadership, and service. In addition, Jernigan was a member of one of four student teams whose projects were selected for funding from the Creativity and Innovation Strategic Growth Area. The Redshift: Virtual Reality Project-Based Learning team is creating virtual reality software and project-based lessons that teachers can use in their classrooms. The four-student team also includes students from Computer Science, Computer Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering; the faculty advisor is Joseph Pitt, a professor in the Department of Philosophy.

Seven students from the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences were among the 18 selected for the 2018 Graduate School Diversity Scholars cohort. The students are: Nada Berrada, ASPECT; Audra Jenson, Philosophy; Mark Marinoble, Educational Leadership and Policy StudiesEzgi Seref, ASPECT; Jyotsana Sharma, Counselor Education; Faith Skiles, ASPECT; and Lindsay Whittaker, Philosophy.

The students presented their Diversity Scholars projects on May 3 at the Graduate Life Center. A description of each Diversity Scholar’s project is available at the first link.

The following students in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences submitted an abstract for the Student Experiential Learning ConferenceAlana Aassett, Professional and Technical Writing; Allie Ahn, Political Science; Micaela Albright, Criminology and Sociology; Sebastian Andrade, International Relations; Paige Atherton, Human Development; Sydney Austin, Human Development; Dhanya Babu, Human Development; Andrew Bacso, Political Science; Grace Baggett, Literature and Language; Robert Beauchamp, International Studies; Bryanna Berry, Human Development; Maria Betances-Koegle, Political Science; Jensen Blevins, Human Development; Allie Bochna, History; Jessica Boehling, Human Development; Hunter Bowers, Political Science; Rachel Boxwell, Political Science; Amelia Brown, Communication Studies; Elysia Budu, History; Madeleine Caceres, Political Science; Sophia Campos, Philosophy, Political Science, and Economics (PPE program) and Political Science; Patrick Carello, National Security and Foreign Affairs; Jasmine Castillo, History; Allison Cedrone-Ricks, Human Development; Nala Chehade, History and International Studies; Oziomachukwu Chinaka, Human Development; Quinton Cookis, History; Michelle Corinaldi, Sociology; Conor Crotty, International Studies; Rachael Dawson, Political Science; Jessica Dorsch, National Security and Foreign Affairs; Ashley Doyle, Public Relations; Dara Finley, Political Science; Caroline Fountain, International Studies; Nicole Geis, International Relations; Michael Gish, Political Science; Katarzyna Goebel, Literature and Language; Hannah Goode, Professional and Technical Writing; Michaela Gosting, Human Development; Kelly Guthrie, Criminology; Tashi Gyatso, Political Science; Jason Hadley, Political Science; Hannah Hagan, Human Development; Thomas Hale, Political Science; Noor Hameed, Human Development; Kathryn Hampton, International Studies;Leah Han, Human Development; Robert Hanson, Political Science; Elizabeth Haugdahl, Human Development; Robert Hodges, Political Science; Lauren Hoyns, Literature and Language; Lauren Hughes, Human Development; Connor Ingalsby, International Studies; Danielle Jeffers, Multimedia Journalism; Jordan Jenson, Fashion Merchandising and Design; William Johnson, Theater Arts; Alex Jones, Political Science; Karl Krull, Political Science; Jordan Law, Political Science; Stephanie Lemus-Ortiz, International Studies; Natalie Logan, Human Development; Ira Long, Political Science; Lindsey Lozoskie, National Security and Foreign Affairs; Spencer Maclay, Political Science; Ronald Maniece, Public Relations; Bryan Marceau, Political Science; John Marin, International Studies; Alyssa Marshall, Political Science; Armand Matini, Political Science; Rebecca McCord, National Security and Foreign Affairs; Meghan McDonald, Political Science; Maura McDonough, Political Science; Kelsey McGregor, Human Development; Sarah Mease, Literature and Language; Jessica Meeks, Human Development; Kelsea Mensh, Spanish; Emma Morris, Political Science; Dana Mouritzen, National Security and Foreign Affairs; Jane Nunn, National Security and Foreign Affairs; Kathleen Pierce, Residential Environments and Design; Hannah Pledger, National Security and Foreign Affairs; Naire Poole, Theatre Arts; Shalini Rana, Creative Writing and Professional and Technical Writing; Carly Rettie, Human Development; Emma Rhodes, History; Nicole Romagnoli, Political Science; David Schmidt, National Security and Foreign Affairs; Andrew Schurr, Theatre Arts; Sarah Shaver, Human Development; Ben Shenal, Political Science; Allison Sieber, International Studies; Caroline Slocumb, Human Development; Ebone Smith, Communication Studies; Cricket Spillane, International Relations; Grace Stevens, International Relations; Julia Strang, Human Development; Claire Sutton, Political Science; Hannah Tarr, Human Development; Sophia Trout, Multimedia Journalism; Brigid Tuite, Fashion Merchandising and Design; Ashley Uy, Human Development; Jessica Vishneski, Human Development; Emily Warwick, National Security and Foreign Affairs; Sam Wentworth, History; Kelly Wiegand, History; Andrew Wills, History; Lindsey Windhausen, Human Development; Patrick Wirth, Political Science; Olivia Wood, History and Classical Studies; and Christian Yoon, Political Science.

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