Political Science Academic News

Timothy Luke, the University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Political Science, published “Dismantling the Resilience Machine as a Restoration Engine,” The Resilience Machine, ed. Jim Bohland, Simin Davoudi, and Jennifer Lawrence (New York: Routledge, 2019), pp. 191–208.

 

ASPECT doctoral student Caroline Alphin and François Debrix, director of ASPECT and a professor in the Department of Political Science, presented “‘Necro-geopolitics’ Exploited Vulnerabilities, Disadvantaged Lives, and Death-Making” at the Annual Meeting of the Social Science History Association, which was held November 8–11 in Phoenix, Arizona.

Emma Braxton Miller, a sophomore Political Science major, participated in the student conference, SCUSA 70: Cooperation Reimagined: American Influence in Increasing Complex World, which was held October 24–27 at West Point. The conference focused on terrorism and non-state actors; Miller worked with other students from around the world in teams. Participation was funded by the Hume Center and West Point; it is an annual opportunity for a Virginia Tech Political Science or International Studies student.

François Debrix, director of ASPECT and a professor in the Department of Political Science, published “The Viral Mediation of Terror: ISIS, Image, Implosion,” in ISIS Beyond the Spectacle: Communication Media, Networked Publics, and Terrorism, ed. Mehdi Semati, Piotr Szpunar, and Robert Brookey (London: Routledge, 2018), pp. 77–91, with ASPECT alumnus Ryan Artrip.

Scott Nelson, director of graduate studies in the Department of Political Science, served as a Visiting Scholar at the Dr. Seaker Chan Center for Comparative Political Development Studies at Fudan University, Shanghai, China, from September 21 to October 19. During his stay, he hosted academic seminars, presented lectures on his research, and explored student exchange opportunities.

Timothy Luke, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Political Science, published “Counting Up AR-15s: The Subject of Assault Rifles and the Assault Rifle as Subject,” The Lives of Guns, ed. Jonathan Obert, Andrew Poe, and Austin Sarat (New York: Oxford University Press, 2018), pp. 70–92, and “Have a Heart for the Holocene: The Politics of Ark Activism, Collaborative Conservation, and Sponsored Survival at Museums,” Fast Capitalism 15.1 (2018).

LaDale Winling, an associate professor in the Department of History, in collaboration with Robert Nelson and Justin Madron from the University of Richmond, launched an interactive website, “Electing the House of Representatives, 1840–2016.”

Assisting with the project were undergraduate Jennalee Beazley, international studies, Spanish, and economics; L. T. Wilkerson, a master’s student in history; and the following CLAHS alumnae: undergraduate history majors Caitlin Brown, Victoria Fowler, and Rachel Snyder; international relations major Sarah Rouzer; and graduate students Carmen Bolt, Alexandra Dowrey, and Rebecca Williams, who completed a master’s degree in history.

The College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, the Department of History, and the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies helped fund this project with grants for research and data work.

Three students in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences were among the 15 recipients of a Fralin Undergraduate Research Fellowship award for 2018–2019.

The college’s recipients were: Thomas Hale, a senior in political science; Kelsey McMahon, a junior sociology major, and Sophia Textoria, a junior in human development and family science.

Each Fellow received $1,000 to conduct research with a Virginia Tech faculty mentor over the course of one academic year.

Timothy Luke, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Political Science, edited Democracy and Populism: The Telos Essays, by Alain de Benoist, with Russell Berman (Candor, New York: Telos Press Publishing, 2018).

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