The following graduate students presented papers at the annual ASPECT Graduate Conference titled “Rethinking Otherness in the Age of Neoliberalism”: Judson Abraham, ASPECT, “The Question of ‘Corporatism’ in Left-Populist Discourse”; Caroline Alphin, ASPECT, presented “Bulletproof Neoliberals: Reframing the Biohacker as an Intensified Accelerationist”; Nada Berrada, ASPECT, “The Neoliberal State and Youth Policy in Morocco”; Allie Briggs, ASPECT, “The Perfect Crime: Race as Technology and Modern Liberal Sovereignty”; Jay Burkette, ASPECT, “Utopia as a Verb: Mutual Aid as Its Process”; Linea Cutter, ASPECT, “Spaces of Empire in Popular Culture: A Critical Analysis of To the Bone”; Joshua Earle, Science, Technology and Society, “The Problem of the Sexy Cyborg: Race, Gender, and Otherness in Transhumanism”; Jordan Fallon, Political Science, “‘Omar Comin’: Black Subversive Marginality and Neoliberal Subjectivity”; Rob Flahive, ASPECT, “Aesthetics of the Other: Reinscribing Colonial Urbanism through Preservation”; Jenni Gallagher, History “‘Remove Him to the Poorhouse’: Poor-Relief in Montgomery County, VA, 1830–1880”; Ruth Grene, Hispanic Studies, “Views of the Subaltern in Mexican Film”; Johannes Grow, ASPECT, “The Geopolitics of the ECSC”; Robert Hodges, ASPECT, “Two Differing Intentions Toward Alterning the International System: A Discussion of al-Qaeda and Islamic State Goals”; Jack R. Leff, Science, Technology, and Society, “Enclosable Futures: How Prisons Render Prisoners’ Futures for ‘Public’ Consumption”; John R. Legg, History, “White Lies, Native Revision: Public Memory and the U.S.–Dakota War of 1862”; Leigh McKagen, ASPECT, “An Imperial Journey: Castaway Narratives in Star Trek: Voyager”; Mohammed Pervaiz, ASPECT, “Valorizing and Other-ing Bodies: Examples in Historical and Contemporary Turkey”; Sarah Plummer, ASPECT, “Panoptic Policing: A Theory of Surveillance as Resistance”; Shaun Respess, ASPECT, “Why/When Suicide Offends the Neoliberal Us”; Mary Ryan, ASPECT, “The Last Gasp: How Racial Crisis Threatens U.S. Democracy”; Patrick Salmons, ASPECT, “Althusser’s Reproduction of Race in Society”; Katy Shepard, ASPECT, “Art as the Creative Process, Identity Building, and Liberation”; Faith Skiles, ASPECT, “Decidedly Neo-Confucian: Western Missionaries’ Ordering of Space in Korea”; Spenser Slough, ASPECT, “Consumerism, Material Culture, Gender, and Performance as Historical Method in Investigating Commonplace Financial Records of Rural Communities”; Emma Stamm, ASPECT, “Algorithmic Determinacy and Interpretative Psychedelic Science”; Alexander Stubberfield, ASPECT, “State of the Art: The Habitat Quantification Tool and the Environmental Defense Fund”; Anthony Szczurek, ASPECT, “Sacred Climate Futures: Hindutva Imaginaries of Climate Change (2015–2018)”; Madison Tepper, ASPECT, “Radical Counterperformance: Invoking Bodily Affect as to Global Capitalism”; Molly Todd, ASPECT, “Affective Juxtaposition and the Border Crossing Experience of Pixar’s Coco”; Shelby Ward, ASPECT, “State In/security and War Tourism: Sri Lankan Identity Politics and Tourism Mapping Practices”; Sara Wenger, ASPECT, “The Strange Case of Aura Dolls: Posthuman Anxiety and the Sex Work Debate”; Zachariah Wheeler, ASPECT, “Back to the Future: Symbolic Revolution, Aporia, and the Death of Neoliberalism”; Tara Wilson, Political Science, “Evaluating the Provable Successes of the United Nations Human Rights Council”; and Sengul Yildiz-Alanbay , ASPECT, “Constructing the ‘Other’ through a Discourse of Compassion: The Representation of the Iconic Image of Alan Kurdi in Turkey’s Foreign Policy Towards the EU.” The conference took place March 21–23 on campus.

Barbara Allen, a professor in the Department of Science, Technology and Society, published “Exemple d’une étude participative en Santé-Environnement: Étude participative en Santé-Environnement Ancrée Localement (EPSEAL) sur le front industriel de la zone Fos-sur-Mer/Étang de Berre (France),” Les Cahiers de la Recherche-Santé, Environnement, Travail 12 (2018): 12–14, with Alison Cohen, Yolaine Ferrier, and Johanna Lees.

Barbara Allen, a professor in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society, published “Exemple d’une étude participative en Santé-Environnement: Étude participative en Santé-Environnement Ancrée Localement (EPSEAL) sur le front industriel de la zone Fos-sur-Mer/Étang de Berre (France),” Les Cahiers de la Recherche-Santé, Environnement, Travail 12 (2018): 12–14, with Alison Cohen, Yolaine Ferrier, and Johanna Lees.

Janet Abbate, a professor from the Department of Science, Technology, and Society, published “Code Switch: Changing Constructions of Computer Expertise as Empowerment,” Technology and Culture 59 (2018): S132–S157.

Barbara Allen, a professor in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society, published “Strongly Participatory Science and Knowledge Justice in an Environmentally Contested Region,” Science, Technology and Human Values 43.6 (2018): 947–71.

Christine Labuski, an associate professor in the Department of Sociology, and Philip Olson, an associate professor in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society, published “‘There’s Always a [White] Man in the Loop’: The Gendered and Racialized Politics of Civilian Drones,” Social Studies of Science 48.4 (2018): 540–63.

From June 12 to 15 Barbara Allen, professor of Science, Technology, and Society, conducted a seminar, “Introduction to Community-Based Participatory Research,” to introduce researchers to community-based participatory research for health. The four-day training event was hosted at the Institute for Advanced Study (IMéRA) in Marseille, France. Assisting Allen was the rest of the Fos “Etude participative en santé environnement ancrée localement” (Locality-based Participatory Environmental Health Survey) research team. The training was available at no cost to the 20 French researchers and public health officials who participated, thanks to support from the Agence nationale de sécurité sanitaire de l’alimentation, de l’environnement et du travail (Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health).

Daniel Breslau, an associate professor and chair of the Department of Science, Technology, and Society, was interviewed for a report titled “Blockchain Technology Could Revolutionize More than the Financial World,” which was broadcast on WVTF, the local National Public Radio affiliate, on May 25.

The college is pleased to announce the following tenure and promotion decisions by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors at its June 6 meeting.

Promoted to associate professor with tenure were: Danna Agmon, History and ASPECT Core Faculty; Amy Azano, School of Education; María del Carmen Caña Jiménez, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures; Jason Crafton, School of Performing Arts; Erika Grafsky, Human Development and Family Science; Stefanie Hofer, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures; Eunju Hwang, Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management; Benjamin Jantzen, Philosophy; Melanie Kiechle, History; Christine Labuski, Sociology; Philip Olsen, Science, Technology, and Society; Dustin Read, Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management; Nadine Sinno, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures; Trevor Stewart, School of Education; Catherine Ulrich, School of Education; LaDale Winling, History; and Haiyan Zhu, Sociology.

Promoted to the rank of professor in the past academic year were: Janet Abbate, Science, Technology, and Society; April Few-Demo, Human Development and Family Science; Matthew Gabriele, Religion and Culture; James Ivory, Communication; Gerard Lawson, School of Education; Heidi Anne Mesmer, School of Education; Lydia Patton, Philosophy; Tina Savla, Human Development and Family Science; and John Wells, School of Education.

Also recognized with promotion were the following: Joseph Scallorns, English, to senior instructor; Matthew Goodrum, Science, Technology, and Society, to collegiate associate professor; and Peggy Quesenberry, Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management, to collegiate assistant professor.

A Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Science degree program in Science, Technology, and Society were approved by the Board of Visitors at its June meeting. The programs, which will help students develop new ways of understanding and intervening in the relationship of science and technology to society, will begin in Spring 2019, pending approval of the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia.

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